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TaMolly's opens fast-casual spinoff

TaMolly's opens fast-casual spinoff


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The long-established regional TaMolly's Fresh Mex Grill LLC has opened a new fast-casual version of the full-service concept in Plano, Texas, modernizing the concept for a more fast-paced urban market.

TaMolly’s, with 11 full-service units in Arkansas, Louisiana and Texas, debuted the new Chiladas Fresh Mex Grill last week in a suburban lifestyle mall.

“This takes what’s really great about TaMolly’s, which is more of a traditional-style Tex-Mex food, and gives a more nuanced, updated spin to it,” said Night Keyes, chief executive parent company Williamson Family Investments of Texarkana, Texas. “The fast-casual platform is really reflective of how people live now.” The company expects to have four or five units in the Dallas-area market over the next year, he added.

The new Chiladas unit covers 2,500 square feet, compared to the 7,000 to 9,000 square feet in a typical full-service TaMolly’s, Keyes said. TaMolly’s on average have about 240 seats, and Chilada’s offers about a third of that. Keyes said a planned patio will add another 1,200 square feet of seating.

The Chiladas evolution of the 27-year-old TaMolly’s concept better fits with the direction diners are going, Keyes said. “We realized we needed a different menu here to really speak to the people are looking for this type of food in the fast-casual platform,” Keyes said.

Chiladas has positioned itself to be distinguished from popular line-burrito concepts like Chipotle and Qdoba by offering prepared plates. “We think our customers will want a little more of the full-service restaurant experience,” Keyes said. “These are items put together carefully and thoughtfully so people can enjoy it.”


Zaxby’s Cooks Up Spin-off Recipes with ‘Zax Pack Hacks’

Zaxby’s, the fast-casual restaurant known for its chicken fingers, wings, and signature sauces, is rolling out “Zax Pack Hacks” for make-at-home meals using some of its best-loved ingredients, all available in its Zax Family Packs.

BBQ Bacon Cheddar Fries, Chicken Parmesan on Texas Toast and Zaxby’s Skillet Scramble are three new mashups made at home from ingredients available via drive-thru, curbside pickup and delivery. The brand is capitalizing on changing consumer behaviors driven by the pandemic.

“People are cooking more and looking for ways to spice up their meals,” said Joel Bulger , Zaxby’s CMO. “We got creative in the kitchen and came up with some really delicious recipes using Zaxby’s existing menu items. It’s a fun way for our guests to experiment with their favorite dishes.”

The recipe for BBQ Bacon Cheddar Fries calls for shredded cheddar cheese and bacon in addition to 2 cups of Zaxby’s crinkle fries, five boneless wings and one Zaxby’s ranch sauce cup. The one-pan dish is easy to make as a sharable appetizer or a stand-alone meal for two with Zaxby’s distinct BBQ flavor profile. Click here to view the recipe.

Chicken Parmesan on Texas Toast features Zaxby’s famous Texas toast as a base plus Zaxby’s Chicken Fingerz and marinara sauce cups. The dish is topped with parmesan cheese and makes one-two servings. View the instructions here .

Zaxby’s Skillet Scramble is made with two Chicken Fingerz and crinkle fries plus eggs, shredded cheese, salsa and a bell pepper. Chop the Chicken Fingerz and dice 1/2 cup of fries per serving and sauté in a skillet. Then use the same skillet to scramble the eggs. Zaxby’s Skillet Scramble can be served on a plate or rolled up in a tortilla as a burrito. Find the full directions here .

All three Zax Pack Hacks recipes are fast, customizable and can be doubled or tripled to feed groups. Zaxby’s first launched Zax Family Packs in April as an affordable bundled menu option to feed families sheltering at home. The limited time offering took off and has outperformed expectations, likely earning it a permanent spot on the menu.


Q&A with Bob Strate of TaMolly's Mexican Restaurants

Bob Strate, COO of TaMolly’s Mexican Restaurants, affectionately refers to Beyond Celiac as his partners in “the attack of the gluten monster.” He’s super passionate about keeping the gluten-free community safe in all of his restaurants and we are excited to share this Q&A with you.

What prompted you to seek GREAT Kitchens training?

Understanding the basics of the gluten-free diet is not enough. Knowing the importance of “doing this right” was the foundation that all of our plans were based on. The decision to use Beyond Celiac as our partner in achieving a staff competent in gluten-free food preparation was easy. We knew we didn’t have time to reinvent the process – instead we used someone that was credible and had the support and materials to help us be confident in our new gluten-free plans. Gluten-free is not a “Special of The Week.” It is something that greatly impacts many of our guests – and we have a passion to gain their trust because we care enough to “do it right.”

Is your kitchen entirely gluten-free? If not, how do you prevent cross-contact from occurring?

Our kitchens are not entirely gluten-free. Cross-contact is the greatest challenge in a successful gluten-free effort. It’s not as simple as using a different grill or spatula. Preventing cross-contacts begins on the farm where our ingredients start in harvesting, storage, packing and shipping, and ends at the table when the finished entree is served to our guest. We select suppliers that understand the importance of proper handling of each ingredient. We travel to many of the growers and shipping facilities to ensure they are knowledgeable of proper food handling and have the resources to avoid accidents in cross-contact. Our visits help emphasize our passion in getting clean ingredients, not just for our gluten-free guests, but for those with other food allergies, like peanuts (which we are free of as well).

We choose to not make our flour tortillas “in-house,” which eliminates most of the hazard of airborne contaminants. Dedicated gluten-free fryers are essential, as well as color-coded ladles for the few ingredients which do contain gluten. Pan liners, gloves, dedicated work stations and color-coded utensils are all great tools, but our greatest tool is the fact that our managers are the only ones that prepare a gluten-free meal and serves it directly to the gluten-free guest.

Bob visiting a vendor to ensure their products
are in fact gluten-free.

What would you say are “hot spots” in the kitchen that gluten-free diners should be aware of?

In my opinion, the “hot spots” that have the greatest potential cross-contact points are the kitchen working surfaces. From the prep area, where raw ingredients are chopped, blended, and prepared, to the cutting boards where a dish is in final prep for serving. Other significant hot spots are fryers, which must remain clean and dedicated to gluten-free foods only.

I’d recommend reading the menu’s gluten-free statement, which is usually posted in fine print on the gluten-free menu. If there are no clear statements about “dedicated” fryers or other key statements to indicate an understanding of the nature of “cross-contact,” then you need to question the experience of the establishment.

Are there certain menu items that should trigger the recognition of a “hot spot?”

In our family we have three members who have a known non-celiac gluten sensitivity (‘gluten sensitivity’), so when we dine out we always look at menu selections prepared directly on a restaurants “flat grill” or “char-broiler.” These pieces of equipment are common in most all casual dining restaurants and are impossible to clean between entrées to the level that would remove gluten, and too expensive to have dedicated equipment for most operations. If menu selections are of the nature that would indicate these meals would normally utilize methods of grilling on one of these pieces of equipment.

Bob checking out lettuce on a farm
in Monterey California

If a host/hostess or waiter/waitress seem unfamiliar with celiac disease, gluten sensitivity and gluten-free needs, what action would you recommend that a gluten-free diner take?

To me, this would indicate foremost that gluten-free diners are not a normal part of the daily business, unless it is in its initial period of roll-out. Don’t miss a good opportunity by pre-judging the establishment. Allow the manager to be the key in your decision to eat or move on.

One mistake we made early on is focusing all the energy in training and implementing the gluten-free process through the managers at each location and not exposing servers or other dining room staff to the extensive levels as we did managers and kitchen staff. I thought it was so important to get the process correct and that management and cooks are the only ones directly that ever touch a gluten-free meal, and therefore, we neglected to cover important details early. Learning from that experience, we now have an annual meeting every August with our entire staff, at each of our locations, on the gluten-free service we offer as well as updates concerning any allergen experience.

What’s the best approach for reaching out to a restaurant to determine if the establishment can accommodate gluten-free needs?

First, go to the company’s website and confirm their performance with social media. It’s important to evaluate comments posted for accuracy and the date a post was made. Once you confirm it is not just another half-done program, check with the manager by phone on suggestions and let them answer questions. This experience is all about confidence in the staff! If you can feel comfortable with the social media, gluten-free menu on the website, and manager conversation, then enjoy the experience.

What ways have you adapted your menus or ingredients to expand your gluten-free options in your establishment?

Due to the nature of our Mexican offering, we had a head start on the gluten-free experience over someone in the donut business or the Italian food business, for instance. We did have to make some ingredient changes to avoid hidden barley, wheat, and rye components. Because we “cook daily from scratch,” the process was pretty easy. Using more corn starch instead of flour as thickening agents in sauces is just one example of the changes.

In 2012, we introduced a new fast casual-style restaurant into the Dallas, Texas market called “Chiladas.” Having the knowledge from the Beyond Celiac GREAT Kitchens training and using all resources available to us, from our chef to our primary food vendor, U.S. Foods, we were able to design the new menu, with gluten-free options, for this new concept and created a 75% gluten-free menu. This was a much easier task than converting an established 28 year old restaurant concept to achieve broad gluten-free offerings.

Bob Strate with lettuce farmer
Paul Warren Kohatsu

Is there a particular story that comes to mind that illustrates the impact you have by offering gluten-free food safely?

There are so many positive stories from this experience, so it’s difficult to pick one. The most gratifying part of the process came unexpectedly after most of the work was done. In our first detailed training session with our “Front of House Staff,” I realized the significant positive impact that this had on our team members. Our servers gained a greater sense of purpose to their daily routine that was unexpected. The guest experience from so many “heartfelt positive comments” made coming to work more exciting for those in direct contact with our gluten-free guests. We understand that the confidence and trust shown by safely offering a gluten-free alternative to the smaller secondary markets is one that empowers our staff to be even more diligent in doing gluten-free right every time we are asked to.

How can consumers persuade other restaurants to participate in gluten-free training?

This is a real big point for me. I encourage diners that are searching for the gluten-free experience to open into more areas, to be even more positive in their social media postings. Gluten-free diners need to be encouraging to any restaurant to expand their offerings to include gluten-free. It is going to grow if the guests that need the options are very supportive to those who go to the efforts to do it right.

One last note on this topic is that if you have any negative feedback from a poor experience, attempt to resolve directly with the management of that facility, rather than retaliate publicly on social media. There will be mistakes it happens. It’s important to understand that you could be the link between that restaurant and educating them on safe gluten-free food preparation. It can be a win-win!

What are you particularly proud of when it comes to your gluten-free program?

We are most proud of the support and noticeable growth in many underserved markets. We are encouraged by the social media’s positive support which we read and respond to individually. I’m proud of our staff who knows the importance of each gluten-free meal served, in that someone trusts them to either make their day rock with great/safe food, or they could make their next few days horrible. It’s the trust that is shown that we don’t take for granted.

What is unique about the way you address gluten-free needs? What can others learn from?

The one thing that we stress is that a manager is the only one that touches a gluten-free meal. Regardless of what’s going on, the managers know that if a gluten-free order hits, they must stop, wash hands, put new gloves on, and make it. My daughter-in-law, who also has gluten sensitivity, suggested directly marking the plate somehow to bring more confidence to the diner. We use a disposable plastic marker for all gluten-free dine-in meals and place bright yellow stickers marked gluten-free on all to-go packaging.

Tell us a little bit about your restaurant.

TaMolly’s is a family friendly casual restaurant group serving Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana with eleven locations. The TaMolly’s operation has been around for over 30 years using traditional and heritage Mexican dishes, cooked daily from scratch beginning at 7:30 each morning. We have great vendor support with our US Foods partners and are able to keep in touch with the actual farmers who grow the produce for our restaurants. Our food would be categorized as Tex-Mex flavors with bright atmospheres and a family-friendly staff. The markets we serve have populations of 30,000 to 75,000. We recently started a fast casual chain in the Dallas market called ‘Chilada’s Fresh Mex Grill’ with two locations.

Interested in learning more about the gluten-free menu at Chilada’s Fresh Mex Grill? Download it here.

Why are you, personally, in the restaurant business?

I am not real good at anything else and I enjoy people. We are in the entertainment business daily have the chance to perform for 7,000 guests, hoping to live up to their expectations is rewarding in many ways. Meeting the needs of others is a healthy way to make a living, that I feel will add years to one’s life.


Zaxby's cooks up spin-off recipes with 'Zax Pack Hacks'

ATHENS, Ga. , Sept. 1, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Zaxby's, the fast-casual restaurant known for its chicken fingers, wings and signature sauces, is rolling out "Zax Pack Hacks" for make-at-home meals using some of its best-loved ingredients, all available in its Zax Family Packs. BBQ Bacon Cheddar Fries, Chicken Parmesan on Texas Toast and Zaxby's Skillet Scramble are three new mashups made at home from ingredients available via drive-thru, curbside pickup and delivery. The brand is capitalizing on changing consumer behaviors driven by the pandemic.

"People are cooking more and looking for ways to spice up their meals," said Joel Bulger , Zaxby's CMO. "We got creative in the kitchen and came up with some really delicious recipes using Zaxby's existing menu items. It's a fun way for our guests to experiment with their favorite dishes."

The recipe for BBQ Bacon Cheddar Fries calls for shredded cheddar cheese and bacon in addition to 2 cups of Zaxby's crinkle fries, five boneless wings and one Zaxby's ranch sauce cup. The one-pan dish is easy to make as a sharable appetizer or a stand-alone meal for two with Zaxby's distinct BBQ flavor profile. Click here to view the recipe.

Chicken Parmesan on Texas Toast features Zaxby's famous Texas toast as a base plus Zaxby's Chicken Fingerz and marinara sauce cups. The dish is topped with parmesan cheese and makes one-two servings. View the instructions here.

Zaxby's Skillet Scramble is made with two Chicken Fingerz and crinkle fries plus eggs, shredded cheese, salsa and a bell pepper. Chop the Chicken Fingerz and dice 1/2 cup of fries per serving and sauté in a skillet. Then use the same skillet to scramble the eggs. Zaxby's Skillet Scramble can be served on a plate or rolled up in a tortilla as a burrito. Find the full directions here.

All three Zax Pack Hacks recipes are fast, customizable and can be doubled or tripled to feed groups. Zaxby's first launched Zax Family Packs in April as an affordable bundled menu option to feed families sheltering at home. The limited time offering took off and has outperformed expectations, likely earning it a permanent spot on the menu.

About Zaxby's
Founded by childhood friends Zach McLeroy and Tony Townley in 1990, Zaxby's is committed to serving delicious chicken fingers, wings, sandwiches and salads in a fun, offbeat atmosphere where customers are considered friends. Zaxby's has grown to more than 900 locations in 17 states and is headquartered in Athens, Georgia . For more information, visit zaxbys.com or zaxbysfranchising.com.

Media Contact:
Jordan Vines
Tombras
+1 (540) 629-3137
[email protected]


Cheesecake Factory

Social Monk Asian Kitchen is a fast-casual restaurant from the Cheesecake Factory. Its menu includes salads, sandwiches and rice and noodle bowls with flavors from Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia and China.

The Asian-inspired eatery opened its first location in February in California.

The Cheesecake Factory made another bet on fast-casual restaurants in October through its acquisition of Fox Restaurant Concepts.

Previously, Cheesecake Factory invested in two of Fox Restaurant Concepts' chains, Flower Child and North Italia, in anticipation of the deal. Flower Child, a health-focused fast-casual chain, has more than two dozen locations nationwide. North Italia serves up lunch, dinner and a weekend brunch featuring pizza, pastas and entrees with the flavors of northern Italy.

Cheesecake Factory has a market value of $1.7 billion, and its stock has fallen nearly 16% over the past year.


Chiladas Fresh Mex Grill Opens in Dallas Today

Chiladas, a family owned company, officially opens its second location today on Lovers Ln. The first is located in Plano at 6145 Windhaven Pkwy.

Owners Night Keyes (with Williamson Family Investments) and Katie Day greeted customers and media members at a preview yesterday, and encouraged them to try everything on the menu as they stepped up to the counter to order. I was invited as a guest.

Keyes and Day said they chose this location in order to appeal to the surrounding neighborhood. Located right off the Dallas North Tollway, the colorful and inviting patio is sure to draw in customers from the high traffic area.

“All of our concepts so far have patios, and we offer happy hours and we have a great kids’ menu,” Day said. “We’re a lot about the community and bringing people together. We want to be a place that people can come together.”

Williamson Family Investments, which also owns the regional chain TaMolly’s, has been in the Mexican food business since the 80s and has stayed true to the method of always cooking from scratch. The fast-casual concept of Chiladas was developed in order to continue serving the freshest ingredients, but in a smaller and more accessible environment.

Chiladas prides itself on knowing the source of the produce and has developed a menu, with the help of Chef Chris King, to offer guests thought-out dishes with complementary pairings.

“We chop all our own vegetables and we take our own flank steak, trim it, and marinate it in house,” Keyes said. “We are very proud of our menu.”

Compared to places like Chipotle, Chiladas provides each guest with chef-prepared dishes instead of the experience of walking down the line to pick and choose the meal. It might not sound as fast-casual as Chipotle, but I was pleasantly surprised by the quick and friendly service. I’m a big fan of Chipotle’s chips and guacamole, but Chiladas’ loaded guacamole with bacon was definitely the highlight of my experience.

Although the restaurant is modern and taqueria-style compared to the traditional chain TaMolly’s, Chiladas’ menu doesn’t fail to include authentic, hand-rolled enchiladas. Choose three of the four options: brisket, carnitas, chicken, or cheese for $7.75.

Sauces and salad dressings are homemade from scratch including an avocado buttermilk ranch and toasted cumin and cilantro vinaigrette. Chiladas also offers delivery services to surrounding areas and a catering menu.

Marley Dablo is the culinary intern at D Magazine. She will be an online journalism senior at the University of Oklahoma this coming fall. She plans to attend culinary school upon graduation in hopes of combining her writing and kitchen skills to ultimately have her own cooking show one day.


Zaxby’s Cooks Up Spin-off Recipes With ‘Zax Pack Hacks’

September 01, 2020 // Franchising.com // ATHENS, Ga. - Zaxby&rsquos, the fast-casual restaurant known for its chicken fingers, wings and signature sauces, is rolling out &ldquoZax Pack Hacks&rdquo for make-at-home meals using some of its best-loved ingredients, all available in its Zax Family Packs. BBQ Bacon Cheddar Fries, Chicken Parmesan on Texas Toast and Zaxby&rsquos Skillet Scramble are three new mashups made at home from ingredients available via drive-thru, curbside pickup and delivery. The brand is capitalizing on changing consumer behaviors driven by the pandemic.

&ldquoPeople are cooking more and looking for ways to spice up their meals,&rdquo said Joel Bulger, Zaxby&rsquos CMO. &ldquoWe got creative in the kitchen and came up with some really delicious recipes using Zaxby&rsquos existing menu items. It&rsquos a fun way for our guests to experiment with their favorite dishes.&rdquo

The recipe for BBQ Bacon Cheddar Fries calls for shredded cheddar cheese and bacon in addition to 2 cups of Zaxby&rsquos crinkle fries, five boneless wings and one Zaxby&rsquos ranch sauce cup. The one-pan dish is easy to make as a sharable appetizer or a stand-alone meal for two with Zaxby&rsquos distinct BBQ flavor profile. Click here to view the recipe.

Chicken Parmesan on Texas Toast features Zaxby&rsquos famous Texas toast as a base plus Zaxby&rsquos Chicken Fingerz and marinara sauce cups. The dish is topped with parmesan cheese and makes one-two servings. View the instructions here.

Zaxby&rsquos Skillet Scramble is made with two Chicken Fingerz and crinkle fries plus eggs, shredded cheese, salsa and a bell pepper. Chop the Chicken Fingerz and dice 1/2 cup of fries per serving and sauté in a skillet. Then use the same skillet to scramble the eggs. Zaxby&rsquos Skillet Scramble can be served on a plate or rolled up in a tortilla as a burrito. Find the full directions here.

All three Zax Pack Hacks recipes are fast, customizable and can be doubled or tripled to feed groups. Zaxby&rsquos first launched Zax Family Packs in April as an affordable bundled menu option to feed families sheltering at home. The limited time offering took off and has outperformed expectations, likely earning it a permanent spot on the menu.


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The New Whole Foods Spin-Off Has Arrived on the East Coast, and We Went Inside to See What's Doing

What's Whole Foods Market 365 like? Take a spin around the stripped-down version of the original model.

For very nearly as long as Whole Foods has been around, it has been awfully fashionable to crack jokes about Whole Foods, and how expensive shopping there can be. This has always been a relatively un-clever road to take, because anyone who knows very much about the brand is well aware of the fact that when we talk about Whole Foods, what we&aposre really talking about is two stores, and not just the one. For every eye-wateringly expensive, entirely unnecessary snack food being made by an ex-investment banker with a dream of getting you to pay $6.99 for, say, a couple of kale chips, for every insipid $4 cup of soup, there&aposs a terrific house brand item, created under the 365 label (365 because it&aposs for everyday, get it), usually available at very competitive prices.

Because of this, with a modicum of discipline (don&apost shop while you&aposre hungry, and certainly skip past that unrepentantly bad hot bar), a thrifty shopper might make a relative killing at even the most fancified Whole Foods, skipping past the non-mandatory bells and whistles and going straight for the own-brand goodness. When you start looking at a Whole Foods for what it can do for you, how much quality food you can snap up at a reasonable price, like this is some sort of secret Trader Joe&aposs hiding out inside a Whole Foods, it&aposs pretty difficult to stay mad.

For fans of all things 365, a 2015 announcement that the company would be building stores designed to streamline the Whole Foods shopping experience and spotlight the value-minded brand sounded like a huge win—it would strip the concept down to the bare minimum, give us more of what we needed, and less of what we didn&apost. Initially rolled out as 365 by Whole Foods, it&aposs now called Whole Foods 365, and there are six stores in locations as diverse as Santa Monica, California, and Akron, Ohio. This week, the East Coast waves hello to its first store, located on the lower levels of a luxury apartment building, towering over a scrubbed-up strip of Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn sixteen more locations across the country have either been announced or are under construction. (One additional location opened early on in the Seattle suburbs, but appears to be at least temporarily closed, don&apost ask, it&aposs a whole thing.)

What are the stores like? Well, to haul out that extremely rough comparison again, your typical 365 footprint answers the question, what would happen if you crossed a Whole Foods with a Trader Joe&aposs? Sure, there&aposs a lot more to it, and we&aposll get to that in a moment, but let&aposs just say, avid shoppers at the latter will immediately understand what&aposs going on, when they walk through the doors. There&aposs an emphasis on economy here, from the overall shopping experience (get in, get out) to the prices (lots and lots of the house brand stuff) to the size of the store (they&aposre big enough, but not too big to overwhelm).

Standards are the same, quality is the same, but meat is pre-cut, pre-packaged there are a couple of dozen types of cheeses rather than the usual dizzying display, there&aposs an impressive amount of produce given the model, but it doesn&apost go on forever, you weigh and label your own to save on labor (and time) at checkout. Again, everything you need is here, with very little of what you don&apost, all based around the premise of saving you a bunch of money. There&aposs also a rewards program—members get an automatic 10 percent off on a range of different products each week, along with other special offers just download an app, and start saving.

Of course, this is Whole Foods, so there are plenty of ways to part you from your money—they don&apost just sell the house brand, there&aposs a lot of other stuff, too. They&aposre big into their Flash Finds offerings, a selection of interesting, often local product, product that is not typically, shall we say, priced to move. Yes, there&aposs a hot bar, yes, it&aposs $8.99 a pound (they won&apost like this being aired in public, but the pricing has changed significantly since they first opened up, and now matches what you pay at a regular Whole Foods store). There&aposs pizza by the slice (or by the pie), too typically, you will also find at least one outside vendor selling fast-casual meals in a store in the Portland, Oregon suburbs, Next Level Burger does 100% plant-based fast food a store in the Silver Lake section of Los Angeles has a taqueria. None of this stuff is cheap. Less so at the outset, and now a bit more, some discipline is once again required to make it in and out of here without running up a gigantic tab, but stay focused on the array of affordable organics (and other things), and you&aposll leave happy, with money still in your wallet.

Because New York is New York, and everything has to be a little different here, the first East Coast branch of the 365 brand doesn&apost quite follow the model you&aposll find in other cities, and it starts with the footprint. At street level, there&aposs a food court of sorts, featuring a branch of Next Level, the aforementioned plant-based fast food spot local brand Orwashers Bakery is here, doing pastries, sandwiches and the like, serving Toby&aposs Estate coffee. There&aposs a Juice Press outlet, along with the store&aposs own Pourit Authority, a super-cool, DIY drinks set-up, with twelve taps𠅎ight for beer and cider, four for wine.

Down on the lower level is where you&aposll find the bulk of the store—here, in a typically-New York, labyrinthine layout, you&aposll find the usual, from canned soup to bulk nuts, not to mention a relatively vast beer selection. Here, as in other 365 stores, the know-it-all beer person who may or may not be hanging around to sort of answer your questions has been replaced by a touch screen a very smart program created in partnership with the Delectable app will tell you everything you ever wanted to know about the beers on offer, and even give pairing suggestions.

On the whole, in Brooklyn, more than in some of the other stores, the line between the two models appears to have been blurred somewhat, but not to worry𠅊t the heart of it all, this 365 store is still very much on brand—it&aposs pretty simple, very straightforward, it&aposs great for everyday shopping, and it&aposll probably be a gigantic hit. And if you don&apost like, it, hey—there&aposs a giant Whole Foods, with every imaginable frivol, located just down the road.


KFC's fast casual concept preps for second location

Yum! Brands is planning to open a second KFC eleven location in early 2014, also in Louisville, Ky. KFC eleven, a fast casual spinoff of the KFC brand, debuted in Louisville in August.

According to Louisville Business First, the concept has been "very well-received" by the community. Anne Fuller, KFC senior director of development, said KFC eleven has exceeded customers' expectations.

The new concept includes rice bowls, salads, flatbreads, soups and more. Products in the pipeline, according to Fuller, include spinach salads, sweet potato fries, pot pie and pasta dishes.

Keep up with what's happening in the restaurant industry

Subscribe now to the Restaurant Operator Daily, which brings you the top stories from Fast Casual, Pizza Marketplace, and QSR Web.



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